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Aircraft Collection

Surround yourself with our award-winning aircraft.

Boeing PT-17 Stearman

From 1934 until February 1945, the Stearman Aircraft Company, a division of the Boeing Aircraft Company, built a total of 8,428 model 75 airplanes for the U.S. Army and U.S.

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Stinson OY-1 Sentinel

The L-5 Sentinel had its roots in the civilian Stinson 105 Voyager sport aircraft that first flew in 1939. In order to meet Army Air Corps requirements, Stinson completely re-engineered the V

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Piper J-3 Cub

The Piper J-3 Cub was vastly popular as a civilian trainer and sport plane before the U.S. Army Air Corps selected the aircraft for evaluation as an artillery spotter/director platform.

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Luscombe T8F Observer

The Luscombe Aircraft Company made a name for itself building two-seat, all-metal sport aircraft before World War II. The most famous was the Model 8, many of which were used in the Civilian.

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Sikorsky S-76A++

The S-76 was the first helicopter specifically designed by Sikorsky to meet the needs of the civilian and commercial markets. Seeing there was a growing need to move workers to off-shore oil.

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Anderson Greenwood AG-14

In 1940, Texas entrepreneurs Ben Anderson, Marvin Greenwood and Lomis Slaughter set out to build a two-seat, low wing aircraft for the sport aviation market.

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Douglas DC-3

The DC-3 was engineered by a team led by chief engineer Arthur E. Raymond, and first flew on December 17, 1935 (the 32nd anniversary of the Wright Brothers flight at Kitty Hawk).

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Chance Vought F4U-5N Corsair

Chance Vought Aircraft Corporation contracted with the US Navy for a single prototype fighter aircraft in June 1938. Vought engineers selected the new 2,000 horsepower Pratt & Whitney R28

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Fairchild PT-19 Cornell

In the late 1930s, the Fairchild Aircraft Manufacturing Company entered their M-62, later known as the PT-19 design to satisfy the Army Air Corps’ call for a primary trainer.

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North American B-25 Mitchell

North American Aviation’s design of a twin-engine medium bomber was approved by the Army Air Corps in September 1939, and the prototype made its maiden flight less than a year later on 19 August 19

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North American T-6 Texan

The North American T-6 Texan was known as "the pilot maker" because of its important role in preparing pilots for combat. The T-6 was the classroom for most of the Allied pilots who flew in W.

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Sikorsky S-76A++

The S-76 was the first helicopter specifically designed by Sikorsky to meet the needs of the civilian and commercial markets. Seeing there was a growing need to move workers to off-shore oil.

Read More!

Anderson Greenwood AG-14

In 1940, Texas entrepreneurs Ben Anderson, Marvin Greenwood and Lomis Slaughter set out to build a two-seat, low wing aircraft for the sport aviation market.

Read More!

Douglas DC-3

The DC-3 was engineered by a team led by chief engineer Arthur E. Raymond, and first flew on December 17, 1935 (the 32nd anniversary of the Wright Brothers flight at Kitty Hawk).

Read More!

Chance Vought F4U-5N Corsair

Chance Vought Aircraft Corporation contracted with the US Navy for a single prototype fighter aircraft in June 1938. Vought engineers selected the new 2,000 horsepower Pratt & Whitney R28

Read More!

Fairchild PT-19 Cornell

In the late 1930s, the Fairchild Aircraft Manufacturing Company entered their M-62, later known as the PT-19 design to satisfy the Army Air Corps’ call for a primary trainer.

Read More!

North American B-25 Mitchell

North American Aviation’s design of a twin-engine medium bomber was approved by the Army Air Corps in September 1939, and the prototype made its maiden flight less than a year later on 19 August 19

Read More!

Stinson OY-1 Sentinel

The L-5 Sentinel had its roots in the civilian Stinson 105 Voyager sport aircraft that first flew in 1939. In order to meet Army Air Corps requirements, Stinson completely re-engineered the V

Read More!

Piper J-3 Cub

The Piper J-3 Cub was vastly popular as a civilian trainer and sport plane before the U.S. Army Air Corps selected the aircraft for evaluation as an artillery spotter/director platform.

Read More!

Luscombe T8F Observer

The Luscombe Aircraft Company made a name for itself building two-seat, all-metal sport aircraft before World War II. The most famous was the Model 8, many of which were used in the Civilian.

Read More!

Boeing PT-17 Stearman

From 1934 until February 1945, the Stearman Aircraft Company, a division of the Boeing Aircraft Company, built a total of 8,428 model 75 airplanes for the U.S. Army and U.S.

Read More!

North American T-6 Texan

The North American T-6 Texan was known as "the pilot maker" because of its important role in preparing pilots for combat. The T-6 was the classroom for most of the Allied pilots who flew in W.

Read More!

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