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Special Exhibits

LSFM Launches…Plane of the Month!

THREE NEW VISITING PLANES ON DISPLAY STARTING TUESDAY, OCT. 12!

Plane of the month is included in your general admission and FREE for members! Become a museum member today!

BROUSSARD ON DISPLAY OCT. 12 – NOV. 30

The Avions Max Holste MH.1521M Broussard was designed by aeronautical engineer Max Holste to meet a French Army requirement for a lightweight liaison and observation aircraft. It first flew in 1952. The Broussard was used in the Algerian War (1954 – 1962) for artillery spotting, air supply, and as an air ambulance. It could take off and land on short runways and was resistant to ground fire. However, its slow speed and distinctive noise—caused by its engine and large propeller—made it easy for Algerian guerillas to detect the aircraft as it approached.

The Broussard left active service in 1981; today there are five Broussards in the United States in flying condition. This aircraft is on loan from Mary Davis Granger. She and her late husband, Marc, purchased it in 2011. Marc Granger’s name appears on the left side of the fuselage under the cockpit.


HAWKER HURRICANE ON DISPLAY OCT. 12 – DEC. 31

First flown in 1935, the Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and built primarily for service with the Royal Air Force (RAF). Along with the Supermarine Spitfire, the Hurricane played a critical role during the Battle of Britain (1940-41) and in the defense of Malta (1941-42). The Hurricane inflicted 60 percent of the losses sustained by the Luftwaffe during World War II, and the aircraft fought in all the major theaters.

This aircraft is on loan from the Dakota Territory Air Museum.


SPITFIRE ON DISPLAY OCT. 12 – DEC. 31

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and other Allied countries before, during, and after World War II. Many variants of the Spitfire were built using several wing configurations. It was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft and was the only British fighter produced continuously throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be popular among enthusiasts; around 70 remain airworthy, and many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world.

This aircraft is on loan from the Dakota Territory Air Museum.

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